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High Fluoroquinolone Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori in the Golden triangle

Via: https://cancersfakianakis.wordpress.com

Conclusions: H. pylori remains a common infection in the Golden triangle. MNZ resistance appears to be high, whereas fluoroquinolone resistance is prevalent and is becoming a significant problem in…

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Fewer malpractice claims succeed, but payouts rise

Via: https://fictionews.com

The rate of paid medical malpractice claims in the United States has declined significantly, dropping nearly 56 percent between 1992 and 2014, researchers report. At the same time, the average payout for successful malpractice claims rose about 23 percent — topping $353,000... #about #actor #around

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Fewer medical malpractice lawsuits succeed, but payouts are up

Via: http://www.cbsnews.com

Shift may reflect changes in laws that place a cap on damage claims, Harvard study author suggests

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H.R. 1215 - Punishing Americans Protected by Obamacare - Legal Reader

Via: http://www.legalreader.com

A newly-introduced bill, H.R. 1215, proposes punishing Americans who aren’t privately insured by capping medical malpractice limits.

What Donald Trump Now Knows: Read The Full US Intel Report On Russia Hacking

Via: http://leadstories.com

The United States intelligence report, ordered by President Obama, on the Russian government's hacking of American political emails, allegedly intended to influence the 2016 presidential election, has been released...

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Fixing What Ails Our Health-Care System

Via: http://www.nationalreview.com

It is a remarkable fact that Americans currently pay more for health care than they do for food. Viewed in broad historical context, this is virtually unprecedented; humans have almost always spent most of their income on sustenance. Even as recently as 1960, Americans spent 17.5 percent of their income on food and 5 percent on health care. Today, we spend 9.9 percent on food and 17.7 percent on health care: zubrin-chart-health-care.jpg Over the same period that food expenditures were cut nearly in half, health-care costs more than tripled. How can this be explained? Both agriculture and medicine have benefited greatly from advances in science and technology. Yet the latter industry has charged Americans less and less while the former has charged them more and more. What accounts for the brilliant success of our food-production system in making its vital products ever more widely and cheaply available at the very same time that our health-care costs spiral out of control? The answer should be clear. Despite an assortment of mandates, regulations, subsidies, free-food and meal-ticket programs, the American food production and delivery system is still basically market-driven. Distortions noted, at the end of the day, the vast majority of food sold in America is bought at supermarkets for cash by individuals who are free to choose what they buy, and who shop for value accordingly. This system works amazingly well. But imagine how things would go if we distributed food the way we allocate health care. Instead of going to the store and buying what we want, we would each pay a monthly food-insurance premium. Armed with such a policy (paid for by our employers out of our paychecks, whether we like it or not) we would each go to the grocery store, where a clerk would fill our cart with what he thought we needed. We would pay out-of-pocket until we hit our deductible, after which point the store would bill our insurance company for the rest. In such a system, neither the shopper nor the store would have any interest in containing costs. This being the case, the store wouldn’t even bother to tell the shopper how much the goods cost, as it really wouldn’t be any of his business. The store’s management would have an obvious financial incentive to fill the cart to the brim, not to mention a legal spur forcing them to do so: Since they were the ones responsible for filling each customer’s cart, any failure on their part to fill it with a necessary item could easily result in a lawsuit. For example, should they fail to include roses in your cart, they could be sued for your girlfriend’s suicide. Of course, she might be the type that prefers wildflowers, or chocolate, or theater tickets instead; how can those contingencies be dealt with? What about a failure on their part to provide you with a portable generator in advance of a power blackout, a fire extinguisher in advance of a fire, or an inflatable raft in advance of a flood? There’s no end to the possibilities of what could go wrong, so clearly, they would need grocery-malpractice insurance. The cost of this would figure into their bill to your food-insurance company, along with the cost of all the useless extra stuff they would be sure to include among your purchases to protect themselves against malpractice lawsuits launched by the army of legal bandits eagerly awaiting such opportunities. These costs would then be passed on to your employer in the form of increased grocery-insurance premiums, who would then pass them on to you by further reducing your pay. It should be obvious that any such absurd system would lead to out-of-control grocery bills. Yet this is precisely the way we distribute health care. In short, the problem that we face is not that there are too many people who lack health insurance, but that there are too many people who have it. In short, the problem that we face is not that there are too many people who lack health insurance, but that there are too many people who have it. If we want to get health-care costs under control, we need a system where the majority of medical expenses are paid for by informed individuals who shop for value and are free to choose what they want to buy accordingly. So what should Congress do? The most effective action the government could take would be to simply ban health insurance and enact transparency laws forcing medical providers to clearly advertise their prices for services rendered. This would crash health-care costs overnight. Unfortunately, things are not so simple. Health-care costs differ from grocery costs in one key respect: They are unpredictable, which means that for most people catastrophic health insurance would still be warranted. What’s more, there would still be indigent Americans unable to pay for health care even at the greatly reduced rates such a system would provide. Such people, however, could be given medical stamps, analogous to food stamps, to help cover all or part of their medical bills. The recently failed Trump-Ryan health-care bill was useless, because it simply perpetuated the current nonsensical system in slightly altered form. To truly fix health care, we would need to build a new system from scratch with two cornerstones: the free market and a safety net — the latter to drive down costs, and the former to protect the most vulnerable. So what would the bill creating such a system look like? It would repeal Obamacare, with all of its mandates, as well as all prior incentives for employer-provided health-insurance plans. It would provide raises for federal employees, replacing their health-insurance policies with cash and encouraging state, local, and private employers to do the same. It would create a regime of enforced transparency, including published prices and hospital-cost ratings calculated by government statisticians, so that the public knew where health-care bargains were to be found. It would include regulations forbidding the uninsured from being charged more than the insured, and laws sharply limiting the maximum punitive damages obtainable from medical-malpractice lawsuits. It would include assistance to help all those meriting government support, including social security, disability, unemployment, and welfare recipients, in paying their medical bills. And it would create a universal system of catastrophic health insurance, administered either through the federal government, the states, or employers. It may be observed that the type of system described above is comparable to the one used in Singapore, which delivers quality health care at one-third the cost of our system. The primary difference is that in Singapore, the increased salary resulting from the elimination of health insurance is reserved in health-savings accounts that each citizen uses to pay for medical expenses. While superior to our current system, such paternalism seems to me unjustified. There are times in life when saving for future health expenses is the wrong thing to do. For example, a student attempting to work his way through college would do much better directing his meager earnings toward that goal, which, once attained, would put him in a far better position to pay for his health care and all other needs later on. The state does not necessarily know what is best for each of us. Individuals should be free to choose. The last item on the bill’s list could stick in the craw of conservatives, because a universal system of catastrophic health insurance might have to be single-payer to pass Congress with bipartisan support. But they should reflect: Such insurance would be very cheap, both because catastrophic insurance is in general cheap and because the free-market principles enshrined in the rest of the bill would drive down health-care costs across the board. Besides which, unless there is serious reform along the lines described above, the ultimate result of Obamacare’s ongoing failure will be an enormously costly single-payer health-care system of the European variety. A system combining free-market principles that dramatically reduce costs with single-payer catastrophic insurance and a safety net for those who need it would certainly be a much better outcome. — Robert Zubrin is president of Pioneer Energy and the author of The Case for Mars: The Plan to Settle the Red Planet and Why We Must. The paperback version of his book, Merchants of Despair: Radical Environmentalists, Criminal Pseudoscientists, and the Fatal Cult of Antihumanism was recently published by Encounter Books.

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Transgender woman known as 'toxic tush doctor' sentenced to 10 years

Via: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

O'Neal Morris, 36, was sentenced to 10 years in prison and five years probation by a Florida court. Her medical malpractice had earned her the nickname 'toxic tush doctor.'

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EBERT & ASSOCIATES INC.

Via: http://www.ebert.com

specializing in aerial and terrestrial photographic analysis, photogrammetric measurement, and digital mapping with a forensic focus, primarily in environmental and land-use cases, and accidents and product liability.

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Medical Malpractice in Emergency Cases

Via: https://www.slideshare.net

A mistake made by a physician during an emergency treatment can alter the patient's health or put him in even more danger. Find out how you can claim compensat…

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Paid medical malpractice claims decrease

Via: https://medicalxpress.com

Using data from the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), a centralized database of paid malpractice claims that was created by Congress in 1986, physicians at Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed the trends in paid medical malpractice claims for physicians in the United States from 1992 to 2014. This is the first analysis to evaluate paid claims by physician specialty at the national level. The findings are published in the March 27, 2017 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Swedish Doctors Charge White Helmets with Medical Malpractice and Abuse of Children

Via: https://uprootedpalestinians.wordpress.com

Posted on March 22, 2017 by Richard Edmondson [ Ed. note – How far and to what lengths would those backing terrorists in Syria go in trying to achieve their objectives? Would it include drugging, a…

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Fluoroquinolone poster child

Via: https://mountainsandmustardseedssite.wordpress.com

I figure if I am going to be on the internet in a cervical neck collar, I might as well show you the fun I had with it. When you have 6 weeks of not being able to do anything but let your spine hea…

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Podcast: Medical Malpractice and Professional Licensing Issues with Michael Favia

Via: https://michaelvfavialawfirm.wordpress.com

The Illinois Professional Licensing Consultants is a group of highly experienced attorneys and investigators who previously worked for the I.D.P.R. will represent and/or defend licensed    professi…

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Achilles Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture Due to Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics — NEJM

Via: http://www.nejm.org

Correspondence from The New England Journal of Medicine — Achilles Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture Due to Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics

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Information for Healthcare Professionals: Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drugs [ciprofloxacin (marketed as Cipro and generic ciprofloxacin), ciprofloxacin extended-release (marketed as Cipro XR and Proquin XR), gemifloxacin (marketed as Factive), levofloxacin (marketed as Levaquin), moxifloxacin (marketed as Avelox), norfloxacin (marketed as Noroxin), and ofloxacin (marketed as Floxin)]

Via: https://www.fda.gov

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Laura Caldwell

Via: http://www.coasttocoastam.com

Laura Caldwell is a former civil trial attorney who is now a law professor at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. She is also director of Life After Innocence and a published author of 14 novels and two nonfiction books. Before beginning her writing career, Laura was a partner in a Chicago law firm, specializing in medical malpractice defense and entertainment law. In 2001 she joined Loyola University Chicago School of Law and has taught Advanced Litigation Writing and International Criminal Law, among others. Laura began her writing career in women’s fiction and soon turned to mystery/thriller. Her first book, Burning the Map , was voted as one of the best books of the year by Barnes and Noble.com. Booklist declared "Caldwell is one of the most talented and inventive … writers around," after the release of The Year of Living Famously and The Night I Got Lucky. While researching her sixth novel, The Rome Affair , Laura was led to the criminal case of a young man who was coerced into confessing to a crime he didn’t commit. Charged with murder, he sat in a Cook County holding cell for nearly six years with no trial date. After hearing about his case, Laura joined a renowned criminal defense attorney to defend him, ultimately proving his innocence and inspiring her first nonfiction book, Long Way Home.

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DaveyoneFamilylawman on Twitter

Via: https://twitter.com

“Swedish Doctors Charge White Helmets with Medical Malpractice and Abuse of Children https://t.co/upPxNvtU7I”

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Swedish Doctors Charge White Helmets with Medical Malpractice and Abuse of Children

Via: https://world4justice.wordpress.com

Reblogged on WordPress.com

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FACT CHECK: Could Cipro and Other Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Cause Irreversible Tendon Damage?

Via: http://hoax.trendolizer.com

Though still rare, the potential risks are significant enough for the Food and Drug Administration to suggest limiting these drugs’ use to cases of absolute necessity. (via: trendolizer.com)

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FACT CHECK: Could Cipro and Other Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Cause Irreversible Tendon Damage?

Via: http://www.snopes.com

Though still rare, the potential risks are significant enough for the Food and Drug Administration to suggest limiting these drugs’ use to cases of absolute necessity.

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18,000 Men and Boys Suing Johnson & Johnson for Popular Drug That Gave them Breasts

Via: http://thefreethoughtproject.com

The number of lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson has surged to over 100,000 in 2017; many from their popular drug Risperdal.

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18,000 Men and Boys Suing Johnson & Johnson for Popular Drug That Gave them Breasts

Via: https://ftsnautodesk.wordpress.com

Annabelle Bamforth The Free Thought Project The number of lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson has surged to over 100,000 in 2017; many from their popular drug Risperdal.Link

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Astoria man sues hospital for $9 million for negligence

Via: http://www.oregonlive.com

An Astoria man has filed a $9 million medical malpractice lawsuit against a city hospital alleging a radiologist was negligent and missed signs of a stroke.

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This antibiotic will ruin you.

Via: https://ingaorama.wordpress.com

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics Source: This antibiotic will ruin you. These “killer pills” have the satanic Sodium Fluoride as main ingredient !! 3. Fluoride in Your Medicine Given all the…

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How the Deadly Drug Invokana Became Too Popular

Via: https://medium.com

Johnson & Johnson dominated the pharmaceutical industry’s news circuit two years ago with a type 2 diabetes drug, Invokana. The company…

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Alaska Supremes toss prisoner’s deliberate indifference med-mal suit against Colorado prison

Via: https://statesupremes.wordpress.com

The Alaska Supreme Court on Friday upheld the dismissal of a prisoner’s medical malpractice suit accusing officials at a Colorado detention facility he was sent to of being indifferent to his…

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FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA advises restricting fluoroquinolone antibiotic use for certain uncomplicated infections; warns about disabling side effects that can occur together

Via: https://www.fda.gov

[05-12-2016] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising that the serious side effects associated with fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs generally outweigh the benefits for patients with sinusitis, bronchitis, and uncomplicated urinary tract infections.

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Product liability claims in the Netherlands

Via: https://attorneynetherlands.wordpress.com

The Dutch market is very challenging for new products. Always check the legal framework of the Dutch market. Therefor I will give a brief introduction to Dutch Product Liability. Dutch law on Produ…

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GOP Health-Care Bill Will Only Get Worse without Emergency Surgery

Via: http://www.nationalreview.com

House Republicans are being herded and whipped into voting for a controversial health-care plan this Thursday. Moderates and conservatives in the GOP may disagree on the problems with the bill, but an increasing number fear that they will be asked to cast a risky vote for a measure that can’t possibly pass the Senate as is and that can’t deliver on the promise to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. “We don’t have a realistic plan to get from point A to what we can sell the public, and if we don’t get one, the Democrats in the Senate will eat our lunch,” one GOP House moderate told me. The bill before the House this week is supposed to be the first of three phases in replacing Obamacare. The bill — phase one — repeals the taxes and revamps the subsidies created by Obamacare. The second phase is meant to involve Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, using his administrative power to repeal Obamacare directives. Speaking about this second phase, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas told CBS’s Face the Nation on Sunday: “That ain’t going to happen.” Cruz went on to cast doubt on the third phase of the process as well, which is supposed to entail passing a package of insurance reforms that would bring down the soaring cost of insurance premiums for Americans. But the third phase is highly problematic. “Bucket three takes eight Democrats” to get to 60, he said. “Right now, Senate Democrats are opposing everything. You can’t get eight Democrats on agreeing to say, ‘Good morning.’” “At the rate we’re going, this bill is moving in key ways to the left and is likely to go more that way in the Senate,” Representative Raul Labrador of Idaho told me. Indeed, Speaker Paul Ryan is already wooing moderate Republicans in the House with more generous health-care tax credits for the elderly. Requests from GOP conservatives to further expand health savings accounts are being brushed aside. Politico reports that “from the White House to the Hill, top GOP officials by-and-large ‘feel talks with the far right are just about done.’” In other words, if something does indeed pass Congress this year, it will be a pale shadow of the “repeal and replace” promise that Republicans have been making for the past seven years. Senator Cruz believes it doesn’t have to be that way. “If it can be passed with reconciliation, it can be repealed with reconciliation,” Cruz told CNSNews in early February. “And we need to use every procedural means possible to fight to stop the train wreck that is Obamacare.” Speaking of the 1974 Budget Act that created reconciliation, Cruz told CBS’s John Dickerson on Sunday: “It lays out a test for what is permissible on reconciliation. . . . The central part of the test is, it is budgetary in nature? If it is budgetary in nature, you can do it. If it’s not, you can’t.” If Republicans let Senate Democrats water down health-care reform even further, they will be making it likely that a full government takeover of the system is only a political turn of the wheel away. Last week, Cruz told reporters, “Under the Budget Act of 1974, . . .  it is the presiding officer, the vice president of the United States, who rules on what’s permissible on reconciliation and what is not.” The role of the parliamentarian, he said, was simply to advise, not rule. If the current parliamentarian, Elizabeth MacDonough, were to rule that GOP-favored reforms (such as allowing insurance companies to sell across state lines or instituting medical-malpractice reform) had only an “incidental” impact on the budget and would therefore be outside reconciliation, the vice president could simply overrule her. “All of these reforms clearly have a major impact on federal health-care expenditures — it’s pure common sense,” Cruz told me. Of course, Senate Democrats would howl that bypassing the Senate’s parliamentarian would represent a coup against Senate traditions. That ignores the fact that Democrats have often manipulated the process in the past, sometimes by ignoring reconciliation rules to pass President Bill Clinton’s welfare-reform proposals. Richard Arenberg, a former aide to several Senate Democrats, calls the Cruz move toward reconciliation “a partisan power grab.” Sadly, the Senate’s behavior has deteriorated in that direction over the last several years, especially when then–majority leader Harry Reid did away with a 60-vote requirement to confirm Cabinet officers and all federal judges below the Supreme Court. If Republicans blink and allow Senate Democrats to water down health-care reform even further, they should know they will be sabotaging true health-care reform and making it likely that a full government takeover of the system is only a political turn of the wheel away. — John Fund is NRO’s national-affairs correspondent.

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Janssen reports data from two Xarelto studies JNJ;BAYRY - The Fly

Via: http://thefly.com

Designed by market professionals, thefly.com has been reporting unbiased market intelligence to both professional and individual investors for more than 12 years. With information directly sourced from Wall Street traders, brokers, and institutional investors, thefly.com effectively delivers relevant, equity news in a concise and timely manner.

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J&J-Bayer anticoagulant ‘beats aspirin’ in recurrent thromboembolism

Via: https://awesomecapital.wordpress.com

Pitted against aspirin in a head-to-head study, Bayer and Johnson & Johnson’s Xarelto significantly reduced the rate of recurrent venous thromboembolism, which are potentially fatal clots that …

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